Why expertise is important in guiding treatment planning, myeloma research, and much more

A new book, “The Death of Expertise: The Campaign Against Established Knowledge and Why it Matters,” highlights the disconcerting rise in anti-expertise sentiment in the U.S. In the era of Wikipedia and Google, everyone can be his or her own “expert.” The bounty of information available is a positive development. But the notion that experts can be wrong and therefore cannot be trusted is a dangerous one.

Global Collaboration Essential to Achieve a Cure for Myeloma

“Our primary objective is to cure myeloma by preventing malignant transformation in patients at risk.” Those are the words of Bruno Paiva, principal investigator of our Black Swan Research Initiative® (BSRI) project in Pamplona, Spain. To truly achieve this, the 200-plus members of the International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) are collaborating on and implementing multiple research projects around the world.

Successful iStopMM launch pioneers a new way to manage disease

This week, the iStopMM team launched the ambitious screening, treatment, and prevention program for MGUS, SMM, and MM in Iceland.

iStop MM® gets off to a fast start

The IMF team just returned from the exciting iStopMM kickoff meeting held September 26-27th at the deCode Genetics facility at the University of Iceland in Reykjavik. A major project funded by the IMF’s Black Swan Research Initiative, iStopMM (Iceland Screens Treats or Prevents Multiple Myeloma) will examine blood samples from approximately 140,000 adults over age 40 in Iceland for the earliest signs of myeloma. The goal of this innovative and ambitious effort, as I have written about in previous blogs here and here, is to stop myeloma before it develops into full-blown disease.

Precision Oncology and the Cancer Moonshot: Where Do We Stand?

There have been recent commentaries on the prospects and potential for both what is called "precision oncology" and Vice President Joe Biden's Cancer Moonshot program. Although I have discussed both in the past, the current news, writes Dr. Vinay Prasad in the journal Nature, is quite “sobering.” The news is sobering because the hype and expectations are way beyond the truth. When costs are high—and in the case of precision oncology, they are extremely high—research efforts must focus on areas of likely success, not on high expense with little likelihood of return. Since myeloma is one of many cancers (and not the most common), we are particularly sensitive about the need to fully justify the spending of every research dollar.

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