Is prevention of myeloma within reach?

Could myeloma be prevented through dietary recommendations, lifestyle changes, and occupational precautions? There is growing evidence that intervention strategies such as these might offer hope—and these ideas will be tested for the first time in the Black Swan Research-funded iStopMM® project in Iceland.

CNN profiles Black Swan Research Initiative’s innovative iStopMM project and asks “Why Iceland?”

CNN’s Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta and his team traveled to Iceland last week to explore the country’s innovative medical projects. During their visit I was honored to have been interviewed by Dr. Gupta, along with Dr. Kári Stefánsson, Founder and CEO of deCODE Genetics, and Dr.

Successful iStopMM launch pioneers a new way to manage disease

This week, the iStopMM team launched the ambitious screening, treatment, and prevention program for MGUS, SMM, and MM in Iceland.

iStop MM® gets off to a fast start

The IMF team just returned from the exciting iStopMM kickoff meeting held September 26-27th at the deCode Genetics facility at the University of Iceland in Reykjavik. A major project funded by the IMF’s Black Swan Research Initiative, iStopMM (Iceland Screens Treats or Prevents Multiple Myeloma) will examine blood samples from approximately 140,000 adults over age 40 in Iceland for the earliest signs of myeloma. The goal of this innovative and ambitious effort, as I have written about in previous blogs here and here, is to stop myeloma before it develops into full-blown disease.

Four Important Ways Iceland’s iStopMM Research Project Will Help Myeloma Patients Globally

The iStopMM research project is about to get started in Iceland. It is supported through the IMF’s Black Swan Research Initiative® and literally will include Screening, Treating OPreventing myeloma. Beginning in October 2016, approximately 140,000 people over 40 in Iceland will be screened with SPEP (serum protein electrophoresis), UPEP (urine protein electrophoresis), and Freelite tests to see if they have MGUS (monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance), smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM), or full-blown multiple myeloma (MM). If they have MGUS or SMM, they will be initially monitored. If they have myeloma, they will be treated.