Huge interest in toxic chemicals triggered by last week's blog: follow up notes

Last week's blog about the link between Agent Orange and the likelihood of developing MGUS and myeloma clearly struck an emotional chord: many are concerned especially about the broader implications. Were others exposed? Are many people exposed to toxic chemicals? Is that what is really causing MGUS and myeloma? Are other chemicals producing similar toxic effects? How long ago can the exposure occur? Can early exposure pose a lingering threat?

More evidence links toxic chemical exposure to MGUS and myeloma

For the first time, direct serum measurements of the known human carcinogen 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in Agent Orange have been linked to the likelihood of developing MGUS (monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance) and myeloma. In a study published online Sept. 3 in the journal JAMA Oncology, Dr.

What Causes Myeloma? New Study Suggests Random Mutations Are Important

A new study published in Science magazine and reported in the New York Times this week shows that random mutations in normal tissues are more important than previously thought. The study, conducted by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers Cristian Tomasetti and Bert Vogelstein, did not analyze myeloma, but developed principles that apply broadly for all cancers.

Understanding MGUS and Early Myeloma: News and Notes

This week there are several interesting items in the news that help us understand how and why monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) occurs, and when it may or may not turn into active myeloma.
 

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