Bold Initiative Comes to Fruition: First Asian Myeloma Network Summit

This past weekend (October 13-15), the International Myeloma Foundation convened the first Asian Myeloma Network (AMN) Summit in Seoul, Korea. The seven countries/regions that make up the AMN – China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan, Korea, Singapore, and Thailand – have worked collaboratively under the auspices of the IMF since 2011. With its structure modeled on the annual International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) Summit, the Seoul meeting addressed a broad range of issues, examining the status in Asia of myeloma diagnosis, research, and treatment, as well as the next steps in implementing data-gathering and clinical trials in the region.  AMN members are clearly excited to be able to measure up to top US and European research groups, such as SWOG, ECOG, IFM, EMN, and the like. Expansion of myeloma research anywhere in the world has the potential to benefit myeloma patients everywhere.

Man's best friend and potent medical ally

The fundamental principle of the IMF’s Black Swan Research Initiative® is that we open every door and turn over every stone in the search for a cure. As it turns out, one of the stones to turn over is close to home. Dogs can smell cancer.

How Gene Editing Can Help Lead to a Cure (Part Two) and the 2017 Nobel Prizes for Science

In last week’s blog post, I discussed the ways in which CRISPR gene-editing technology is allowing researchers to study disease and intervene at the molecular level. There is a sense of euphoria that so many things can be accomplished and, as I noted, the sky is the limit in the potential applications.

Can New Gene-Editing Tools Provide the Roadmap to A Cure for Myeloma?

CRISPR technology was the 2015 science breakthrough of the year. The discovery and implementation of this technology has set off a revolution in genetic research and treatment. But what does it mean for cancer, and specifically, might CRISPR technology be used to help find a cure for myeloma?

Further FDA clinical trial holds may signal the end for checkpoint inhibitors in myeloma

With the placement of two more checkpoint inhibitor combination trials on partial hold, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has now halted all such trials from four different pharmaceutical companies: Merck, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Celgene, and now Roche.  Roche and its subsidiary Genentech announced that the agency has placed a partial hold on two trials that combine atezolizumab (Tecentriq®) with lenalidomide (Revlimid®) or pomalidomide (Pomalyst®) to treat relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma.

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